Here, 1" x 4" pine boards, spaced about a foot apart, offer the look of custom paneling at a fraction of the price. Curtains in narrow vertical stripes break up the wall's horizontal lines. Multi-stripe pillows in complementary hues band together to dress up a neutral sofa. A wide white stripe, applied to the armchair's center using fabric paint (available at craft stores), packs a graphic punch.

If you are into arts and crafts, there are so many ways that you can personalize your space at a low price. For example, you can add your own works of art on the walls. You can also display your collectibles on the shelves. Check out your bookshelves for potential books that you can place on the table. You can hang pictures or place them in picture frames. You can embellish your pillows.


With the multihued curtain fabric as her jumping-off point, designer Ashley Whittaker splashed an amped-up version of pink in three places in the living room—the footstool, the contrasting pillow welt, and the slipper-chair trim. "We wanted the home to feel bright and colorful like Florida but not like a vacation home," says Ashley. She pulled off the cozy yet elegant vibe by grounding the sun-and-surf palette with serious touches, such as the antique demilune tables.
Channel this South Carolina screened-in porch to create the ultimate rustic living room. To get the look, start with a rusty-red painted floor and a massive stone fireplace (don’t forget a hand-hewn wood mantel!), add a mix of rattan or Old Hickory hoop chairs plus a cozy braided rug, then substitute the sofa with a charming wood bed swing. Wrought-iron light fixtures and striped pillows complete the rustic look.
For contemporary living room ideas, dark blues and greens are on trend, but if you don’t want to dive straight into the dark wall trend, you could opt for a couple of pieces of furniture, or go for dark-hued living room accessories instead. Whites, woods and pastels could work well for Scandinavian living room designs. If an eclectic living room is what you’re after, you could go for large print wallpaper, a statement lighting piece, vibrant rug and lots of colourful book or ornament displays. For a country feel, rustic carpet, stone hearths, comfy armchairs and traditional patterns in creams, greens and browns will give you that cosy cottage feel.
Materials that connect to the location are key to character building. Sisal hints at the marsh grasses in an elegant way and is also durable, easy to clean, and ideal for layering. The alligator skull speaks to the local wildlife, while palms in antique glass and fern-patterned pillows are additional nods to the room's Lowcountry vibe and provide a carefree polish.
Wallpaper is one of those trends that just keeps on giving and giving. If you go with a classic chinoiserie wallpaper, you can do just about anything with it as your style changes over the year. This modern self portrait by Chuck Close is a bold contrast to the chinoiserie wallpaper (Iksel's Eastern Eden) behind it in this Miles Redd-designed home. The contrast doesn't stop there: Redd continued to venture beyond design convention by incorporating contrasting jewel tones and mixing modern furniture styles with antique pieces. Oh—and believe it or not, the lime green chair is from Ikea! Proof even the best designers love a good deal.
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We’ve collected 50 rustic living room ideas featuring DIY decor, lovely vintage furnishings and more. Use the filters below to help you find the right rustic living room decor for you. With your idea in hand, you can begin designing your cozy rustic living room. You can even browse our home decor line to find customizable items like pillows, canvases and more.

Surround yourself with aged natural materials and the result is pure rustic beauty. In this cozy window-wrapped sunroom, homeowner Ellen Allen combined a reclaimed wood planked ceiling and walls, an extended stone “baseboard,” and a brick floor to set the rustic scene. An unexpected Lucite table and lots of lush indoor plants and trees keep the room from feeling too dark and heavy.
Employing expensive materials in restrained but meaningful ways lets you enjoy the finer things while staying on budget. Display a fancy wallpaper on a focal wall or as a patterned backdrop for built-in shelves. Buy one really good leather chair, but pair it with a less expensive garden-seat table. Create pillows that showcase pricey silks, brocades, and velvets on their face, but that boast inexpensive fabric backs.
Bring life to your living room by adding houseplants or flowers. However, make sure to do your homework and research on which houseplants fit your home. There are houseplants and flowers that may cause allergies, or may be toxic to your pets. Ask for recommendations from friends or landscapers. However, if you frequently travel, it is best to use artificial plants instead. They are cheaper and last longer.
The elegant bike shelf keeps wheels up and out of the way while turning the bicycle into a decorative wall hanging. Another smart idea that doesn't squander floor space is the floating desk that spans the left side of the room. Its built-in drawers provide a good deal of storage. But what transforms this 500-square-foot studio into a cozy grown-up home are the various details and décor styles that add a one-of-a-kind character, from the colorful prints to the refined furniture.
With the multihued curtain fabric as her jumping-off point, designer Ashley Whittaker splashed an amped-up version of pink in three places in the living room—the footstool, the contrasting pillow welt, and the slipper-chair trim. "We wanted the home to feel bright and colorful like Florida but not like a vacation home," says Ashley. She pulled off the cozy yet elegant vibe by grounding the sun-and-surf palette with serious touches, such as the antique demilune tables.
Because of this ranch-style California home's open floor plan, the owner had to get creative with carving out designated spaces for "rooms." To help differentiate this living room from the adjacent kitchen and den, she placed the midcentury sofa (recovered with leather in the 1970s) on a vintage Moroccan rug she found on eBay. The floor-to-ceiling storage nook keeps books, blankets, and firewood at the ready.
Family photographs instantly add warmth and personality to your home. Take them out of the attic, off your computer, or out of the infrequently viewed albums on your bookshelves, and enjoy them every day. Pick a wall, corner, or entire room. If your chosen spot already has picture molding (found in many older homes), your job will be easy. If not, adding new molding is not that complicated.

In country superstar Ronnie Dunn’s barn-inspired retreat, he and designer Rachel Halvorson created a cozy-and-inviting (hello, towering white slipcovered wingbacks) meets rough-and-tough (read: stunning antler chair) aesthetic. Surrounding the rustic furniture, interior Z-brace board-and-batten shutters give a playful nod to a barn, while varying widths of creamy white poplar paneling create an airy ambience.
We don’t need to tell you the benefits of nesting tables – the secret space saving speaks for itself. Three tables take up the space of one, but as soon as you have guests around, there is more than enough surface area for cups of coffee and glasses of wine. Our favorite styles at the moment are circular tables with metallic frames, and we’ve seen some hexagonal nesting tables that caught our eye too.
Steven Gambrel, one of America's top-tier interior designers, recently had a chance to consider the question. Although he lives and often works in the most urbane precincts of Manhattan, Steven grew up in Virginia and still has ties there. When the owners of a Middleburg horse farm asked him to convert one of their barns into a place for large, casual parties and just hanging out and watching TV, he took it on with relish—his first barn, and on home turf.
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