Contemporary living room décor resists the minutiae of ornamentation and instead puts the focus on space, shape, and color. Its lightweight construction and pliable materials allows designers to explore sleeker lines and implement more daring shapes into their living room decorating ideas. Contemporary style makes a bold statement without being overstated. Browse Living Spaces’ selection of contemporary furniture for living room ideas.

Steven Gambrel, one of America's top-tier interior designers, recently had a chance to consider the question. Although he lives and often works in the most urbane precincts of Manhattan, Steven grew up in Virginia and still has ties there. When the owners of a Middleburg horse farm asked him to convert one of their barns into a place for large, casual parties and just hanging out and watching TV, he took it on with relish—his first barn, and on home turf.
Designed by Studio Razavi, this eclectic Parisian apartment is a breath of fresh air. Not only does it prove that you can use a wallpaper mural in a minimalist environment (the grayscale color palette helps), but it's also the perfect example of how to design a living room that's both fun and relaxed, sophisticated and formal. The key? Seating needs to be comfortable, and materials need to be casual but clean.
Surround yourself with aged natural materials and the result is pure rustic beauty. In this cozy window-wrapped sunroom, homeowner Ellen Allen combined a reclaimed wood planked ceiling and walls, an extended stone “baseboard,” and a brick floor to set the rustic scene. An unexpected Lucite table and lots of lush indoor plants and trees keep the room from feeling too dark and heavy.

You might have thought that wall lamps and sconces were a thing of the past in living room interior design, but our interior designers keep reporting on new covetable styles and our clients keep asking for lighting options that take the least tablespace. Wall lamps and sconces are back in full force; from modern matte finishes to oversized swing arms to Art Deco-inspired lighting and double sconces, illumination options are taking a remarkably different turn.
Chippy and peel-y architectural salvage brings a living room instant age and texture. After all, you do find “rust” in “rustic.” The living room of this grain silo-turned-guest house features numerous reuses of rustic salvage, including weathered sheet metal siding, chippy wood window frames, and even an old Champagne shipping crate that homeowner Amy Kleinwachter topped with a grain sack cushion to make into a footstool.
Use ottomans in place of a traditional coffee table to make better use of your space (because a tiny house means your living room often does double or triple duty when people come over). You can top them with a tray to hold flowers and books, or use as extra seating. Then when it's family time, they become footrests. These red leather ottomans in a small family room designed by Redmond Aldrich strike that perfect balance between formal and casual.
Rather than letting the existing red brick wall define the space, homeowners Neil Frauenglass and George Case chose to paint it a creamy white. From there, they layered a new sisal rug with leather, wicker, wood, and linen to create a stylish and personal rustic space. An old wagon wheel and a collection of vintage mounts add the finishing touches.

It’s not as much about where you put your furniture as it is about the types of pieces you choose. "In each room I design, I try to include at least one round piece, such as a coffee table, that people can walk around without bumping their knees," says interior designer Katie Rosenfeld. "I also add a few armchairs and a versatile piece like a garden stool that can be used as a stool to sit on or as a table for a drink."

A neutral palette comes alive when it consists of a combination of light to dark hues in mix of textures, as this rustic living room by designer Melissa Ervin exhibits. From top to bottom, natural woven-shade capped lamps sit atop metal-and-wood side tables, pillows made from vintage textiles decorate a mohair and leather sofa, and a hide rug tops the nubby sisal floor covering.
It’s not as much about where you put your furniture as it is about the types of pieces you choose. "In each room I design, I try to include at least one round piece, such as a coffee table, that people can walk around without bumping their knees," says interior designer Katie Rosenfeld. "I also add a few armchairs and a versatile piece like a garden stool that can be used as a stool to sit on or as a table for a drink."
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